German-American Day, Presidential Proclamation

Presidential Proclamation: German-American Day, 2014
                                  DEUT-USA©The White House

 

For Immediate Release from the White House

October 03, 2014
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
A PROCLAMATION

        President Barack Obama Ambassador Dr.Hans Peter WittigPresident Barack Obama with Ambassador Hans Peter Wittig,  May 2014 ©The White House/Lawrence Jackson
 

America is and always has been a Nation of immigrants, and from our earliest days, German Americans have contributed to our national identity.

Germans were among the first settlers in the original 13 Colonies, bringing their talents and ideas across the ocean to a new and unfamiliar world. And today, with their descendants and all who followed in their path, we continue to perfect our Union together. On German-American Day, we recognize their distinctive identity and the ways they enrich our country.
German Americans helped build our Nation, and every day they contribute to its growth. As they teach in our schools, farm in our heartland, and serve in our Armed Forces, their German roots offer a sense of their place in the American story. From a land of poets and thinkers, they brought passion for music, science, and art, fortifying our culture and broadening our understanding of the world. Our greatest cities and our biggest advances reflect their daring spirit and diverse contributions.

As we consider our German-American history, we are also reminded that the United States and Germany are vital partners. With the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall approaching, our security and prosperity remain interwoven, and our friendship continues as we work together in pursuit of a more peaceful, stable world. On this occasion, may citizens from both sides of the Atlantic draw strength from the legacy of our Nation’s earliest immigrants who boldly pushed forward in unforgiving times. May our shared past continue to inspire us as we face new challenges in our own time.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 6, 2014, as German-American Day.   I encourage all Americans to learn more about the history of German Americans and reflect on the many contributions they have made to our Nation.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this third day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand fourteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

President BARACK OBAMA

©The White House
 
 
 

The first Presidential Proclamation was made by President Roland Regan in 1983.  However it was in 1987 that Congress passed a law to make the October 6th an official German- American Day.

http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Proclamation_5014

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/10/04/presidential-proclamation-german-american-day-2013

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/10/05/presidential-proclamation-german-american-day-2012

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/10/06/presidential-proclamation-german-american-day-2011

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/presidential-proclamation-german-american-day

 

 

Presidential Proclamation–German-American Day
German-American Day, 2010

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
A PROCLAMATION

The American story has been written by those who have come to our shores in search of freedom, opportunity, and the chance at a better life. The German men and women who braved numerous perils to cross the Atlantic long ago left a legacy of millions of Americans of German ancestry who have been an integral part of our national life. On German-American Day, we pay tribute to the role this community has played in shaping America and contributing to our progress and prosperity.
On October 6, 1683,  13 courageous German families arrived in Pennsylvania to start a new life. They began a chapter in the American narrative that has influenced our country in all walks of life, and their resolve lives on in the men, women, and families of German descent who enhance civic engagement, steer our industries, and fortify our Nation’s character.  

 With their dedication and determination, the United States has been a leader in ingenuity and entrepreneurship, and has delivered a message of hope and opportunity that resonates around the world. Today, German Americans innovate and excel as leaders in all sectors of our society.

On this occasion, we honor not only the countless achievements and rich heritage of German Americans, but also the strong ties between Germany and the United States. Our two nations share unbreakable bonds as allies with solemn obligations to one another’s security; values that inspired those brave settlers four centuries ago; and a vision for a safer, freer, more peaceful, more prosperous world.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 6, 2010, as German-American Day.

I encourage all Americans to learn more about the history of German Americans and reflect on the many contributions they have made to our Nation.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand ten, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth.
President BARACK OBAMA

 ©The White House
 
 
 

For Immediate Release from the White House

October 6, 2004

German-American Day, 2004
By the President of the United States of America a Proclamation

Generations of German immigrants and their descendents have helped build America and chart its course through history. On German-American Day, we recognize these proud citizens for their important contributions to America and honor the bond between two great nations.
German Americans have been part of America’s history since its earliest days, beginning with the establishment of the Jamestown Colony in 1607 and the arrival of German Quakers and Mennonite families in 1683. Many of these early settlers came to America seeking religious freedom and the chance to develop a community based on tolerance and respect for all people. During the westward expansion of the United States, many German families helped settle communities, found cities, and develop the agriculture industry. Over time, the core beliefs of these freedom-loving individuals helped define the liberty and opportunity that our country represents. Their traditions of public debate and active citizenship influenced important social issues such as land reform, abolition, workers’ rights, and women’s suffrage.
This week, our Government is breaking ground for a new Embassy in historic Berlin, exemplifying America’s support of a unified Germany. Sharing a common commitment to freedom, peace, and prosperity, the citizens of Germany and America can build a better future for the benefit of all nations.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 6, 2004, as German-American Day, and I encourage all Americans to recognize the contributions of our citizens of German descent.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-ninth.

President GEORGE W. BUSH

©The White House
 
 
German-American Day 1989 President George H.W. Busch
 

http://www.c-span.org/video/?9412-1/germanamerican-day-proclamation-signing

 

 

 
 
This entry was posted in D-USA-3, Deutsche Geschichte, Deutschland and U.S, Deutschland in der NATO, Deutschland-UK, Deutschland-USA-1, Deutschland-USA-2, Die Bundeswehr 'die Elitärsten Soldaten der Welt', Germany’s Medals for U.S Armed-Forces. Bookmark the permalink.